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Sep
23rd
Tue
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It’s Bisexual Awareness Week! Here Are Five Ways To Celebrate

autostraddle:

It’s Bisexual Awareness Week! Here Are Five Ways To Celebrate

feature image via thenextgreatgeneration.com

Bisexual people make up more than 50 percent of the LGB community, but media, the mainstream, and even LGBT groups often erase our experiences and specific needs or fold them into lesbian and gay programs and statistics. BiNet USA, GLAAD and other organizations hope the first ever Bisexual Awareness Week will be a step toward making more space for for…

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Be the B you want to see in LGBT

Sep
21st
Sun
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tidepooling:

when you want to look cute but don’t want to be harassed by men #justgirlythings

Why I don’t shave my legs

(via bearfax)

Sep
13th
Sat
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faineemae:

i’m a joy to go shopping with.

faineemae:

i’m a joy to go shopping with.

(via racialicious)

Sep
12th
Fri
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elinorjo:

waytoomuchportland:

Technically, this is too LITTLE Portland. 

Dang. When you put them all together like this…

It honestly never occurred to me that The Matador could close. 

Woah produce row???

(via bearfax)

Sep
11th
Thu
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whatismurphywearing:

Season 1, Episode 3: Nowhere to Run

Outfit 2:

  • French pink wrap around dress with upturned collar
  • Belt made of turquoise-studded silver medallions

Notable Accessories:

  • Silver! oval earrings
  • Silver! bangle cuff on left wrist
  • Silver! rings
  • Silver! watch on right wrist

This is the dress of Murphy’s that I lust after!!!

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bisexual-books:

All this week we will be highlighting #27BiStories from bisexual Advocate journalist Eliel Cruz with graphics by Trivo Studio 

Part 1 —  #27BiStories: Appearing Straight, Appearing Gay, and Other Misconceptions Bi People Face:

"In order to get some answers, and to start putting faces on the often overlooked bisexual population, The Advocate asked four questions of 27 bisexual people and those in relationships with someone who is bisexual. The answers come from an eclectic group in monogamous, nonmonogamous, and polyamorous relationships as well as other couplings that just don’t have labels. Their stories depict just a small portion of the bisexual-involved couples all around the world.

In this first part, we asked the couples to name the biggest misconceptions they face in their relationships. Using #27BiStories, readers can respond with their own experiences, and share these stories on social media. This is the beginning of a conversation that begins highlighting the sometimes silent B in LGBT.”

(via weareallmixedup)

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(Source: bearfax)

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thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

THIS!

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

(via bearfax)

Sep
7th
Sun
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putthison:

Complicating The Gap’s “Simple Clothes” Campaign
Rachel Seville, the writer behind Pizza Rulez (a sort of fashion-industry news blog), recently took issue with how The Gap is defining normal through their "Dress Normal" ad campaign. An excerpt: 

The ads each have their own tagline: “Simple clothes for you to complicate” (the stairs). “Dress like no one’s watching” (the makeout). “The uniform of rebellion and conformity” (the vehicular striptease). “Let your actions speak louder than your clothes” (at the driving range). Then: “Dress normal,” the ad concludes—a slogan that reads more like a brainwashing command than a slogan suggesting you gotta head to your nearest Gap. 
To begin with, the word “normal,” especially in fashion advertising, is ridiculously troubling. You’re saying, “Let’s establish that this is what everyone should look like.” The corresponding print ads revealed earlier this month use celebrities like Anjelica Huston, Zosia Mamet, and Michael K. Williams as models, which suggested “dress normal” was a mantra to rely on your something other than your clothes to define “you” (that something being your…celebrity, I guess?).
But according to AdAge, Fincher was adamant that the Gap should use unknowns for the TV spots—and the use of anonymous stand-ins provides a pretty complicated definition of “normal.” Gap seems to assume, without much thought, that “normal” as an aesthetic is very narrow indeed: skinny jeans, little leather jackets, and boxy James Dean-like t-shirts, mostly shown on super svelte white women.  In other words, white and middle-class. Sure, this is an image that we see all the time in fashion advertising, but never is it so exclusively stated and promoted as the standard. “Dress normal,” the ad commands, discounting all other modes of dressing. Dress is limited to just a few pieces that fit in a very specific way. Unless this is an ironic send-up of how fashion advertising promotes such an exclusive and narrow image—which could be brilliant, but seems impossible—this will probably go down as one of the most controversial and troubling fashion ad campaigns in recent memory.

Perhaps not an uncontroversial view, but a thought provoking one. You can read her full piece here.

putthison:

Complicating The Gap’s “Simple Clothes” Campaign

Rachel Seville, the writer behind Pizza Rulez (a sort of fashion-industry news blog), recently took issue with how The Gap is defining normal through their "Dress Normal" ad campaign. An excerpt: 

The ads each have their own tagline: “Simple clothes for you to complicate” (the stairs). “Dress like no one’s watching” (the makeout). “The uniform of rebellion and conformity” (the vehicular striptease). “Let your actions speak louder than your clothes” (at the driving range). Then: “Dress normal,” the ad concludes—a slogan that reads more like a brainwashing command than a slogan suggesting you gotta head to your nearest Gap. 

To begin with, the word “normal,” especially in fashion advertising, is ridiculously troubling. You’re saying, “Let’s establish that this is what everyone should look like.” The corresponding print ads revealed earlier this month use celebrities like Anjelica Huston, Zosia Mamet, and Michael K. Williams as models, which suggested “dress normal” was a mantra to rely on your something other than your clothes to define “you” (that something being your…celebrity, I guess?).

But according to AdAge, Fincher was adamant that the Gap should use unknowns for the TV spots—and the use of anonymous stand-ins provides a pretty complicated definition of “normal.” Gap seems to assume, without much thought, that “normal” as an aesthetic is very narrow indeed: skinny jeans, little leather jackets, and boxy James Dean-like t-shirts, mostly shown on super svelte white women.  In other words, white and middle-class. Sure, this is an image that we see all the time in fashion advertising, but never is it so exclusively stated and promoted as the standard. “Dress normal,” the ad commands, discounting all other modes of dressing. Dress is limited to just a few pieces that fit in a very specific way. Unless this is an ironic send-up of how fashion advertising promotes such an exclusive and narrow image—which could be brilliant, but seems impossible—this will probably go down as one of the most controversial and troubling fashion ad campaigns in recent memory.

Perhaps not an uncontroversial view, but a thought provoking one. You can read her full piece here.

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We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.

— ~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression.

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’. (via jacobwren)

(Source: facebook.com, via weareallmixedup)